What’s Inside the Hut

Learn more about our tradition, mission and teachers

What’s Inside the Hut

Learn more about our tradition, mission and teachers

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Life at the Hut

Before arriving, many people ask us about daily life here at Tea Sage Hut—what we do and what visiting is like.

Mostly, we practice Cha Dao (The Way of Tea). We also eat vegetarian meals, laugh a lot and meditate twice a day. We do a bit of chanting, as well, but participation is voluntary. We learn about tea, and impromptu tea lessons are frequent. Each Tuesday and Wednesday we have more formal tea classes. Tuesdays are about tea as spiritual cultivation, and Wednesdays are about the linear side of tea: tea and tea processing, etc. Thursday mornings we hike into the mountains to fetch water, and in the evenings we have discourses. On Saturdays, there is morning chanting, and we usually have movie nights (with the best popcorn in the world). There is at least one formal Japanese tea ceremony in the Zendo every week, as well.

There are morning and evening meditation sessions for one hour each. If you have never meditated, we can provide instructions. If you have a meditation technique, we permit any practice that is done in quiet.

There is no dinner served at the Hut, though there is fruit, sometimes leftovers and a nearby veggie restaurant if you’re feeling especially hungry one night.

If you’re here to learn about tea, we can teach you about tea. If you’re here for spiritual development, we can teach about that, too. If you’re here to help support and spread the cultivation of wisdom through tea, even better.

Guests stay here anywhere from one night to three weeks. If you are interested in becoming a resident, please contact us. As of now, we are looking for those with web design skills, editing and writing skills and/or photography skills to come be residents.

Visitors are generally housed in a simple, but clean and comfortable, four-bed dorm. We host guests from around the world, and roommates here at the Hut often form strong friendships with the fellow tea spirits they meet here in the center. Depending on who else is visiting when you are here, the dorm may be mixed-gender.

We have two buildings here at the Tea Sage Hut, though one is mostly reserved for long-term residents. They are within five minutes of each other.
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An Ancient Lineage

While we wait for the kettle to finish boiling, let us tell you a bit about our society, school and what little can be said about us—little, for like the “Old Tea-seller”, Baisao, we’d rather offer some tea than tell you about it...

Baisao was an eighteenth century tea sage whose bright spirit illuminates our tradition in more than name alone. A Zen monk for most of his life, at the age of forty-nine he traded in his robes for what was paradoxically the more Zen-infused life of a roadside peddler of tea. His bowls were steeped in the ancient and priceless Spirit of Tea, unclouded by money, theory, ritual or even mind itself—a spirit from before the first fingers plucked the first leaves. And those who came by his wayside hut just might have passed by the old man so strangely donning the crane robes of an ancient Taoist hermit, but for the way the spirit twinkled invitingly in his eyes or the softness of his hands as he poured his tea into worn and cracked bowls... And after such a bowl, the passerby left changed somehow, though perhaps not able to grasp the importance of what exactly had shifted their perspective. He called his stall:

“(通聖亭 Tong Shen Ting) The Hut Which Conveys One to Sagehood.”

Out of place and out of time, he was a revitalization of the ancient forest tea sages who haunted the mountains of a long-forgotten China, offering healing draughts and bits of insight to those who crossed their paths. The Way of Tea as we rediscover and recreate it (or it us) must firstly pay homage to Nature, Heaven and Earth from whose unspoken center tea trees grow. Through a vast and ancient mountain chain of tea wisdom, we also travel down the trails blazed by all the great known and unknown sages of tea: those who cloudwalked early Chinese peaks, retreated to forests hermitages, or practiced Zen tea in Japan and Korea, as well as the gongfu skills of Southern Chinese tea traditions. More specifically, we bow to modern teachers of tea throughout the world, less for preserving tradition and form than for keeping and sharing the spirit of the Leaf then and now. Like Baisao, we promote, cultivate and express an awakening of harmony through tea, at a time when it is so very needed in the world; and like him we do so simply and without asking anything in return. Here is your bowl. It’s free. Like Baisao and the sages before him, we’ve set up our metaphoric hermit’s hut here by the wayside of the oldest highway there is, offering what any sage of any time has offered: A place of stillness and solace to calm yourself and rest from the vicissitudes of life, and should you need it, a bit of spiritual wisdom cultivated in the midst of such a quiet space.

Read the: “What is a Tea Tradition” and other pamphlets below for more info about our tradition.
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Our Aims

Our mission is to promote, cultivate and express an awakening of harmony through tea.

Operating a tea center, we are able to create a space where guests from around the world can connect with such harmony. And since all we offer here is free of charge, the experiences and knowledge gained here will have the most integrity and purity possible.

At Tea Sage Hut, we commit to this goal on a daily level in these ways:

• Offering a daily schedule which is conducive to cultivating wisdom, laughter, and service—all in the spirit of Tea.

• Providing healthy vegetarian meals, clean, organic tea, and lodging.

• Sharing tea ceremony as a transmission of spiritual wisdom, an experience unique to each and every guest.

• Nurturing tea wisdom and knowledge through weekly tea lectures and workshops.

• Operating completely on volunteer hours and function around sustainable, communal, service-oriented living.


* Solely-supporting organic/sustainable or “living Tea” production.
On a larger scale, our goals are to spread the wisdom of tea by reaching more people through our publications and through Tea Sage Hut. These publications include:

* Global Tea Hut (www.globalteahut.org), a monthly subscriber-based mailing which provides a tea magazine, a sample of organic tea and a tea-related gift to hundreds of members in over 30 countries around the world. These publications have changed lives and formed communities around the world, and we aim to expand its reach.

* Wu De’s books on tea wisdom (scroll below)
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A Teacher & Friend

Author and teacher Wu De is a true Chajin (tea person). He has been a practitioner of Cha Dao (The Way of Tea) for over 20 years, and he has reached over 100,000 people through his writings, classes, workshops, seminars and interviews.

Born Aaron Daniel Fisher in rural Ohio, Wu De knew from an early age that his interests lay to the East. His martial arts practice began at an early age, and led him to discover the wisdom locked inside tea leaves when he was a teenager.

Upon graduating from university with a degree in anthropology and philosophy, he moved to India, where he lived and worked in a meditation center for some years. During this time, he prepared tea daily as fuel for his intensive meditation practice, and he laid the groundwork for his later work with tea as a spiritual vehicle.

Wu De then left India to study meditation in Burma, Thailand and eventually Japan. Working closely with a Zen teacher who often used tea ceremonies as a way of conveying Zen wisdom, his insights into The Way of Tea and the ability of tea to convey deep peace were strengthened.

After being ordained in the Soto Zen tradition, he began studying gongfu tea under Master Lin Ping Xiang in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Master Lin taught Wu De about how to serve tea with more skill and focus.

For the last decade, Wu De has been teaching the ancient practice of serving tea from a Zen and tea center in Taiwan, known as Tea Sage Hut. In the last three years, the center’s monthly magazine and organic tea mailing, Global Tea Hut has swelled to connect hundreds of tea lovers and spiritual seekers in over 30 countries. Meanwhile, Tea Sage Hut now houses five long-term students and hosts hundreds of guests per year, sharing The Way of Tea and a more connected way of living and being with each person who joins a tea session there.

In addition to running Tea Sage Hut in Taiwan, Wu De leads tea workshops and seminars around the world.

Wu De’s writings have appeared in The Art of Tea Magazine (of which he is the Senior Editor), The Leaf Magazine (a free, online magazine which he founded), Fresh Cup Magazine (a U.S. beverage industry publication) and elsewhere. He has also authored five books, including Tea Wisdom (Tuttle Publications, 2009), The Way of Tea (Tuttle Publications, 2010), Zen & Tea One Flavor (2013) and Tea Medicine (2014).

Interviews with Wu De have been featured on “Rich Roll Podcast”, Estonia’s Raadio 2 radio station, Malaysian TV and newspapers and elsewhere. Features on Global Tea Hut have been featured in The Huffington Post, Tea: A Magazine and in numerous tea blogs.
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A Life of Tea

Our school is a center of tea wisdom, offering residential as well as long-term courses in Cha Dao. Students here do not learn simply how to make tea, but how to serve it. Cultivating a life of tea involves a lot more than just learning the skillful means, the gongfu, to brew a better tasting cup. We have sought to build harmonious, peaceful tea spaces where people can come to make use of a large collection of tea, teaware, tea wisdom, as well as to learn or practice meditation and self-cultivation. We also seek to expand community, promoting sustainable and ecological tea production, connection to ourselves, our environment and to each other through tea.

At the Tea Sage Hut, guests come and drink tea, eat veggie food and have a bed should they need it. We have weekly tea classes and daily meditation sessions each morning and evening. We also help coordinate travel around Taiwan and put guests in touch with tea farmers, tea and teaware shops and events. All instruction, room and board, and hugs are free! We operate on a donation basis, and guests are free to leave as much or as little as they like for future guests.
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We learn how to serve tea

Besides our school, we regularly set up our wayside stalls in parks, at gatherings and events throughout Taiwan. With charcoal, mountain water and old-growth leaves we sit and serve tea simply and freely from bowls. There is no aim in erecting our roadside huts, other than to offer a bit of calm space and a pause for tea in a bustling world. Our work is pure and simple, unadorned and non-sectarian. We aren’t preaching any philosophy or theory, nor promoting any technique or tradition. We aren’t offering anything more than a warm smile, friendship and loving-kindness through a bowl of tea and the accompanying calm.
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Documents & Sutras About Us

Here are the .pdf of various pamphlets we always have for guests who come stay at the center to read through. They will further your understanding of our lineage, practice and philosophy.
  • Life at the Hut
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    Life at the Hut

    Before arriving, many people ask us about daily life here at Tea Sage Hut—what we do and what visiting is like.

    Mostly, we practice Cha Dao (The Way of Tea). We also eat vegetarian meals, laugh a lot and meditate twice a day. We do a bit of chanting, as well, but participation is voluntary. We learn about tea, and impromptu tea lessons are frequent. Each Tuesday and Wednesday we have more formal tea classes. Tuesdays are about tea as spiritual cultivation, and Wednesdays are about the linear side of tea: tea and tea processing, etc. Thursday mornings we hike into the mountains to fetch water, and in the evenings we have discourses. On Saturdays, there is morning chanting, and we usually have movie nights (with the best popcorn in the world). There is at least one formal Japanese tea ceremony in the Zendo every week, as well.

    There are morning and evening meditation sessions for one hour each. If you have never meditated, we can provide instructions. If you have a meditation technique, we permit any practice that is done in quiet.

    There is no dinner served at the Hut, though there is fruit, sometimes leftovers and a nearby veggie restaurant if you’re feeling especially hungry one night.

    If you’re here to learn about tea, we can teach you about tea. If you’re here for spiritual development, we can teach about that, too. If you’re here to help support and spread the cultivation of wisdom through tea, even better.

    Guests stay here anywhere from one night to three weeks. If you are interested in becoming a resident, please contact us. As of now, we are looking for those with web design skills, editing and writing skills and/or photography skills to come be residents.

    Visitors are generally housed in a simple, but clean and comfortable, four-bed dorm. We host guests from around the world, and roommates here at the Hut often form strong friendships with the fellow tea spirits they meet here in the center. Depending on who else is visiting when you are here, the dorm may be mixed-gender.

    We have two buildings here at the Tea Sage Hut, though one is mostly reserved for long-term residents. They are within five minutes of each other.
  • Our Tradition
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    An Ancient Lineage

    While we wait for the kettle to finish boiling, let us tell you a bit about our society, school and what little can be said about us—little, for like the “Old Tea-seller”, Baisao, we’d rather offer some tea than tell you about it...

    Baisao was an eighteenth century tea sage whose bright spirit illuminates our tradition in more than name alone. A Zen monk for most of his life, at the age of forty-nine he traded in his robes for what was paradoxically the more Zen-infused life of a roadside peddler of tea. His bowls were steeped in the ancient and priceless Spirit of Tea, unclouded by money, theory, ritual or even mind itself—a spirit from before the first fingers plucked the first leaves. And those who came by his wayside hut just might have passed by the old man so strangely donning the crane robes of an ancient Taoist hermit, but for the way the spirit twinkled invitingly in his eyes or the softness of his hands as he poured his tea into worn and cracked bowls... And after such a bowl, the passerby left changed somehow, though perhaps not able to grasp the importance of what exactly had shifted their perspective. He called his stall:

    “(通聖亭 Tong Shen Ting) The Hut Which Conveys One to Sagehood.”

    Out of place and out of time, he was a revitalization of the ancient forest tea sages who haunted the mountains of a long-forgotten China, offering healing draughts and bits of insight to those who crossed their paths. The Way of Tea as we rediscover and recreate it (or it us) must firstly pay homage to Nature, Heaven and Earth from whose unspoken center tea trees grow. Through a vast and ancient mountain chain of tea wisdom, we also travel down the trails blazed by all the great known and unknown sages of tea: those who cloudwalked early Chinese peaks, retreated to forests hermitages, or practiced Zen tea in Japan and Korea, as well as the gongfu skills of Southern Chinese tea traditions. More specifically, we bow to modern teachers of tea throughout the world, less for preserving tradition and form than for keeping and sharing the spirit of the Leaf then and now. Like Baisao, we promote, cultivate and express an awakening of harmony through tea, at a time when it is so very needed in the world; and like him we do so simply and without asking anything in return. Here is your bowl. It’s free. Like Baisao and the sages before him, we’ve set up our metaphoric hermit’s hut here by the wayside of the oldest highway there is, offering what any sage of any time has offered: A place of stillness and solace to calm yourself and rest from the vicissitudes of life, and should you need it, a bit of spiritual wisdom cultivated in the midst of such a quiet space.

    Read the: “What is a Tea Tradition” and other pamphlets below for more info about our tradition.
  • Mission
    Stacks Image 7287

    Our Aims

    Our mission is to promote, cultivate and express an awakening of harmony through tea.

    Operating a tea center, we are able to create a space where guests from around the world can connect with such harmony. And since all we offer here is free of charge, the experiences and knowledge gained here will have the most integrity and purity possible.

    At Tea Sage Hut, we commit to this goal on a daily level in these ways:

    • Offering a daily schedule which is conducive to cultivating wisdom, laughter, and service—all in the spirit of Tea.

    • Providing healthy vegetarian meals, clean, organic tea, and lodging.

    • Sharing tea ceremony as a transmission of spiritual wisdom, an experience unique to each and every guest.

    • Nurturing tea wisdom and knowledge through weekly tea lectures and workshops.

    • Operating completely on volunteer hours and function around sustainable, communal, service-oriented living.


    * Solely-supporting organic/sustainable or “living Tea” production.
    On a larger scale, our goals are to spread the wisdom of tea by reaching more people through our publications and through Tea Sage Hut. These publications include:

    * Global Tea Hut (www.globalteahut.org), a monthly subscriber-based mailing which provides a tea magazine, a sample of organic tea and a tea-related gift to hundreds of members in over 30 countries around the world. These publications have changed lives and formed communities around the world, and we aim to expand its reach.

    * Wu De’s books on tea wisdom (scroll below)
  • Wu De
    Stacks Image 7326

    A Teacher & Friend

    Author and teacher Wu De is a true Chajin (tea person). He has been a practitioner of Cha Dao (The Way of Tea) for over 20 years, and he has reached over 100,000 people through his writings, classes, workshops, seminars and interviews.

    Born Aaron Daniel Fisher in rural Ohio, Wu De knew from an early age that his interests lay to the East. His martial arts practice began at an early age, and led him to discover the wisdom locked inside tea leaves when he was a teenager.

    Upon graduating from university with a degree in anthropology and philosophy, he moved to India, where he lived and worked in a meditation center for some years. During this time, he prepared tea daily as fuel for his intensive meditation practice, and he laid the groundwork for his later work with tea as a spiritual vehicle.

    Wu De then left India to study meditation in Burma, Thailand and eventually Japan. Working closely with a Zen teacher who often used tea ceremonies as a way of conveying Zen wisdom, his insights into The Way of Tea and the ability of tea to convey deep peace were strengthened.

    After being ordained in the Soto Zen tradition, he began studying gongfu tea under Master Lin Ping Xiang in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Master Lin taught Wu De about how to serve tea with more skill and focus.

    For the last decade, Wu De has been teaching the ancient practice of serving tea from a Zen and tea center in Taiwan, known as Tea Sage Hut. In the last three years, the center’s monthly magazine and organic tea mailing, Global Tea Hut has swelled to connect hundreds of tea lovers and spiritual seekers in over 30 countries. Meanwhile, Tea Sage Hut now houses five long-term students and hosts hundreds of guests per year, sharing The Way of Tea and a more connected way of living and being with each person who joins a tea session there.

    In addition to running Tea Sage Hut in Taiwan, Wu De leads tea workshops and seminars around the world.

    Wu De’s writings have appeared in The Art of Tea Magazine (of which he is the Senior Editor), The Leaf Magazine (a free, online magazine which he founded), Fresh Cup Magazine (a U.S. beverage industry publication) and elsewhere. He has also authored five books, including Tea Wisdom (Tuttle Publications, 2009), The Way of Tea (Tuttle Publications, 2010), Zen & Tea One Flavor (2013) and Tea Medicine (2014).

    Interviews with Wu De have been featured on “Rich Roll Podcast”, Estonia’s Raadio 2 radio station, Malaysian TV and newspapers and elsewhere. Features on Global Tea Hut have been featured in The Huffington Post, Tea: A Magazine and in numerous tea blogs.
  • School
    Stacks Image 7365

    A Life of Tea

    Our school is a center of tea wisdom, offering residential as well as long-term courses in Cha Dao. Students here do not learn simply how to make tea, but how to serve it. Cultivating a life of tea involves a lot more than just learning the skillful means, the gongfu, to brew a better tasting cup. We have sought to build harmonious, peaceful tea spaces where people can come to make use of a large collection of tea, teaware, tea wisdom, as well as to learn or practice meditation and self-cultivation. We also seek to expand community, promoting sustainable and ecological tea production, connection to ourselves, our environment and to each other through tea.

    At the Tea Sage Hut, guests come and drink tea, eat veggie food and have a bed should they need it. We have weekly tea classes and daily meditation sessions each morning and evening. We also help coordinate travel around Taiwan and put guests in touch with tea farmers, tea and teaware shops and events. All instruction, room and board, and hugs are free! We operate on a donation basis, and guests are free to leave as much or as little as they like for future guests.
  • Roadside Tea
    Stacks Image 7404

    We learn how to serve tea

    Besides our school, we regularly set up our wayside stalls in parks, at gatherings and events throughout Taiwan. With charcoal, mountain water and old-growth leaves we sit and serve tea simply and freely from bowls. There is no aim in erecting our roadside huts, other than to offer a bit of calm space and a pause for tea in a bustling world. Our work is pure and simple, unadorned and non-sectarian. We aren’t preaching any philosophy or theory, nor promoting any technique or tradition. We aren’t offering anything more than a warm smile, friendship and loving-kindness through a bowl of tea and the accompanying calm.
  • Pamphlets About the Center
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    Documents & Sutras About Us

    Here are the .pdf of various pamphlets we always have for guests who come stay at the center to read through. They will further your understanding of our lineage, practice and philosophy.


Wu De’s Books:

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